Sie sind nicht angemeldet.

Lieber Besucher, herzlich willkommen bei: Battlefield Berlin Forum. Falls dies Ihr erster Besuch auf dieser Seite ist, lesen Sie sich bitte die Hilfe durch. Dort wird Ihnen die Bedienung dieser Seite näher erläutert. Darüber hinaus sollten Sie sich registrieren, um alle Funktionen dieser Seite nutzen zu können. Benutzen Sie das Registrierungsformular, um sich zu registrieren oder informieren Sie sich ausführlich über den Registrierungsvorgang. Falls Sie sich bereits zu einem früheren Zeitpunkt registriert haben, können Sie sich hier anmelden.

1

Samstag, 17. Juli 2010, 17:20

Principles of Tabletop Operations

The Principles of Tabletop Operations
In Warfare, there are many different approaches to a problem. Oftentimes, there is more than one solution to a particular problem, and just as often, there is often only one likely solution to a tactical situation. This post isn't going to try and cover each and every possible permutation on the that can occur on the tabletop, there’s not enough bandwidth for that.

However, as a basic approach to tactics, you have to take into consideration the underlying principles of Operations (both real and on the tabletop) and factor them into your game plan. Now, how you take each one of these items into account and apply it to the tabletop might, could (and in some cases should) be different than the way I approach it.

But, the fact of the matter is, your going to need to at least know, if not understand the basic concepts behind these principles to succeed on the battlefield. The good thing is, many of us know about them and use them on a regular basis, even though we might not even realize we are doing so. Many of them go hand in hand, and reinforce each other. Used as a whole, they provide a solid foundation on which to build.

1. Objective
In Most games you’ll have at least 5. Two of your enemies o b j e c tives. 2 Of your own o b j e c tive. Your last Objective is a plan on how to defend yours whilst attacking his, and doing so successfully.
Identify the Overall Objective of the Game. Identify how you want to achieve this o b j e c tive. Start to formulate a plan. It does not have to be a highly detailed, complex, fully thought out plan, and it should be something more specific than “Roll more Killing Dice than my opponent.” When you place a platoon, have an o b j e c tive (goal) for it in mind. It could be to defend. It could be to move forward.
It should not be written in stone what you want to do with your plan. Some people like to say “No Plan Survives Contact with the Enemy.” Why? That’s because your enemy is a thinking being who you have to assume is at least as smart as you are, and he has a vote in what you will do. You may not like his vote. Be prepared to deal with it.

2. Offensive/Perseverance
Offensive Action is used to Seize, retain, and exploit the initiative. However, many player by nature are not Offensive Minded types. Some are counter-punchers, preferring to entice their enemy into attacking them and the counterattacking. Others defend only, preferring to cede the initiative to the attacker, and then forcing that attacker to use it. Ofttimes it can seem a bit disconcerting to just sit and turtle on your side of the board, and having your opponent make all the moves. This is where Perseverance comes into play. Perseverance is recognizing that yes, even if you have lost a vehicle or stand or possibly platoons, the battle as a whole isn’t over yet.

3. Massed Effects And
4. Economy of Force
These two principles in my opinion go hand in hand. Though "mass" is one of the “original” principles on the original "concentration" has also been used to describe it. Massed Effects is the concentration of effects to accomplish the mission (Objective). Mass the effects of overwhelming combat power at the decisive place and time. Unfortunately, "mass" is frequently neither understood nor applied in this manner. Many think that it means Superior numbers, but in truth, composition of those numbers matters as much (if not greater than) the effects of mass itself. Firepower is but one capability that a commander seeks to mass. The principle of "Mass" sometimes means what the concept seemed to mean in Napoleonic times: to bring together in time and space soldiers or supporting weapons. Such practices can be detrimental, in order to achieve Mass Sometimes you end up creating a large target that attracts more enemy attention than it should.
This is where Economy of Force comes into play. If it’s going to take two platoons to tie down an enemy unit away from your Objective, then don’t use three platoons to tie down that unit. You are hurting yourself and helping your enemy. Simply put, Economy of Force is Allocating minimum essential combat power to secondary efforts. Mass and Economy of Force are the two sides of the coin.
In 15 Minuten sind die Russen auf´n Kurfürstendamm...

2

Samstag, 17. Juli 2010, 17:20

5. Maneuver
Position your platoons to achieve the Objective. Maneuver in and of itself can produce no decisive results but if properly employed it makes decisive results possible through the application of the principles of the Offensive, Mass, Economy of Force, and Surprise. It is by maneuver that a superior player defeats a stronger opponent. Sometimes, ceding the maneuver Battle, especially when in a superior defensive position, may be acceptable. This is PERSONAL JUDGEMENT call though. Even a counter-attacking/counterpunch strategy involves maneuver on both sides, in one case though it is limited, but no less significant.

6. Unity of Effort
Also known as Unity of Command, Unity of Effort is a form of coordination and control each player should desire to achieve. It is very hard to do so, but that does not diminish it’s importance. Unity of effort, distilled to its base, is a common purpose and direction through Unity of Command, Coordination, and Cooperation, and is the operational function that is the prerequisite to success. Without unity of effort on your part, any other players tabletop play can negate the advances you make. Unity of effort is the function require for success in any tabletop game; Unity of Command is the “form” you should seek to attain it. The operational principle is Unity of Effort.

7. Security
8. Surprise

These two go hand in hand, like Mass and Economy of Force they are the two opposite sides of the same coin. With regards to Surprise, every game has a couple. Sometimes it’s “mostly” random...good dice rolls, bad dice rolls when good ones are needed. Other times it’s because you mis-measured and are in range of that PakFront. Be prepared to take advantage that results from surprise. Tactical or strategic surprise does not always mean open-mouthed amazement (although this is a common result, accompanied by cursing). A unit may be "surprised" by an attack it has seen coming for several turns if this attack is too powerful for it to resist by itself and if no other unit is within SUPPORTING DISTANCE.
The principle of war known as "Security" may be defined as all measures taken to avoid "Surprise." At a minimum, Security means “Keep an eye on all things at all times.” Make sure you’ve moved all the troops you’ve wanted to. Make sure you’ve fired everything you need to fire. Make sure you’ve made any other rolls (Morale or otherwise) that you need to make. Yes, there is a time limit. No, you do not get “Extra Credit” for finishing the game early. Now, I am not advocating a slow, overly cautious approach, but it’s wise to have a checklist, mental or otherwise, to go through when playing. That way you don’t forget to move that platoon of tanks back so it won’t get flanked the next turn.

9. Simplicity.
Also known as the K.I.S.S. method. Keep your plans simple. The more complex they are, the more things can go wrong. The more things that go wrong, the more chances you have to lose. The more chances you have to lose; the more likely you are going to lose.
When you take into account no Plan Survives contact with the enemy, the obverse it true, it’s often easier to recover from a simple plan gone wrong, than a complex plan gone wrong.

10. Exploitation
This is a hard Principle to pigeonhole, as several other principles apply to it, but having seen instances, both in my own games and others, where this was ignored or missed, I think it’s necessary to consider. The principle of exploitation, is to "take advantage of and make lasting the temporary effects of battlefield success.” Exploitation is subordinate to the principles of Maneuver and Objective for exploitation as a type of offensive operation is a function of other principles. However, the concept of exploitation here has a much broader scope. It pertains to capitalizing on all successes, and planning to do so even before achievement of success. Too often players plans for worst-case scenarios; they too rarely plan for greater success than might normally be expected. The cumulative effects of multiple sequential or simultaneous successes are also seldom taken advantage of. More players are looking for whats going to go wrong, rather than whats going to go right.
The principle of exploitation encourages momentum. It makes it possible for your units to expand and consolidate gains, keeping the enemy off balance and on the defensive. Good Strategists will try and follow the lines of least resistance that lead to vital o b j e c tives, pour on the pressure when opponents falter, reinforce successes, and abandon failures. These observations apply with equal validity at the operational and tactical levels, and should not be overlooked.

Last, but certainly not least, is
11. MORALE

No, not your troops. Yours. Your morale, and outlook towards the game, has a great affect and effect. Your morale impacts your play on the tabletop, and your opponents as well. If you have a good morale, chances are your opponent will as well, and you’ll both have and enjoyable game. If either of you has poor morale, the games going to be a drag. A Fun drag perhaps, but still a drag. If both of you have bad morale, you might be better off rolling a die to see who wins and walk away before anything bad happens.
If you doubt this, consider the words of George C. Marshall, who knew a thing or two about morale and fighting men in General:
“Morale is a state of mind. It is steadfastness, courage and hope. It is confidence and zeal and loyalty. It is élan, esprit de corps, and determination. It is staying power, the spirit which endures to the end--the will to win. With it, all things are possible, without it everything else, planning, preparation, production, count for naught."
Quelle
In 15 Minuten sind die Russen auf´n Kurfürstendamm...

3

Sonntag, 18. Juli 2010, 01:49

12. ... and then there are dice ... ;)

Nee, im ernst: Gute Sammlung:thumbup:, aber im Ernstfall nicht immer 100%ig umsetzbar.
“Never trade the joy of playing for the pursuit of victory, and lead by example.”

Dieser Beitrag wurde bereits 1 mal editiert, zuletzt von »Strand« (18. Juli 2010, 11:26)


4

Dienstag, 10. August 2010, 01:50

Zitat

Identify the Overall Objective of the Game. Identify how you want to achieve this o b j e c tive. Start to formulate a plan. It does not have to be a highly detailed, complex, fully thought out plan, and it should be something more specific than “Roll more Killing Dice than my opponent.” When you place a platoon, have an o b j e c tive (goal) for it in mind. It could be to defend. It could be to move forward.


Finde heraus, was die Siegesbedingungen in diesem Spiel sind. Denk Dir einen Plan aus, wie Du diese Siegesbedingungen erreichst.

Wenn Du einen platoon platzierst oder bewegst, dann überlegt Dir, was dieser platoon erreichen soll. Und überprüfe, ob dies dem Erreichen der Siegesbedingungen nützlich ist.

Als Erläuterung vielleicht:
Z.B. bei der Mission "Breakthrough" soll man als Angreifer nicht wie der Name vielleicht suggeriert einen Durchbruch erzielen. Man soll als Angreifer ab der sechsten Runde ein objective contesten, ohne dass ein gegnerisches team dies ebenfalls tut. Dazu ist es nicht notwendig, sämtliche gegnerische platoons zu zerstören. Es reicht, wenn man sie ablenkt, in dem man sie beschäftigt oder bedroht.

Man legt bei breakthrough als Angreifer die objectives selbst, und kann direkt aus der Reserve kommend ein objective contesten. In einem Spiel habe ich mich darauf beschränkt, den in einer fast undurchdringlichen Verteidigungsstellung verschanzten Gegner ein wenig zu beschäftigen, indem ich ihm ein paar Ziele bot. Gewonnen hab ich dann, weil ich mich aus der Reserve kommend mit Infanterie so sehr um das objective gelegt hatte, dass mein Gegner gar kein team in die Nähe des objectives bringen konnte. Dass er objectives zu verteidigen hatte, hatte mein Gegner schlichtweg 4 Runden vergessen.

In meinem letzten Spiel gegen Strand hat dieser ein platoon von 5 Panzer IV bis zur 7ten Runde im ambush gelassen ( es ging um ein Fighting Withdrawl), weil er mit der Drohung des vernichtenden MG-Feuers aus dem ambush und mit der Möglichkeit, das platoon aus dem ambush herauskommend ein objective contesten zu lassen, mich mehr am Erfüllen der Siegesbedingungen gehindert hat, als er das mit dem tatsächlichen Zerschiessen eines platoons zu einem früheren Zeitpunkt hätte tun können.
In 15 Minuten sind die Russen auf´n Kurfürstendamm...

Dieser Beitrag wurde bereits 1 mal editiert, zuletzt von »tattergreis« (10. August 2010, 01:56)


5

Dienstag, 10. August 2010, 08:49

Ich denke auch, dass das Ziel der Mission immer im Vordergrund steht. Es gibt allerdings auch Nationen, die eher dazu neigen die Moral des Gegner zu brechen, als ein Missionsziel zu eroberrn. Die Spielweise unterscheidet sich da sogar wenn der gleiche Spieler mit verschiedenen Nationen die gleiche Mission spielt. In der Entwicklung eigener Taktiken ist da FOW sehr individuell.

Grade was die Einschätzung der einzelnen Truppengattungen angeht, bestehen große Unterschiede in der Wertschätzung. Um es einfacher zu machen, empfehle ich sich z.B. die Aufgabenverteilung in einer Fußballmannschaft vorzustellen. Eine bestimmte Vielfalt von Aufgaben fällt an und kann von Spezialisten bewältigt werden. Andere Mannschaften spielen so, dass bestimmte Aufgaben weniger anfallen (z.B. verteidigen), als andere.

Meine Idee von diesem Spiel ist es, den Gegner eher auszukontern, bzw. ihn dazu zu bringen Punkte anzugreifen, die für mein Ziel unwichtig oder entbehrlich sind. Was ich sehr schwierig finde, ist einen schnellen und direkten Angriff hin zu bekommen. Der Gegner spielt da leider selten mit.....

Und noch eins habe ich aus dem vergangenen Spielen gelernt: Die Beherrschung der Zeit und die Fähigkeit schnelle sinnvolle Züge zu setzen sind fast noch wichtiger als eine geniale Stragie.

How....TzunGenosse hat gesprochen ;)

6

Dienstag, 10. August 2010, 11:13

Es gibt allerdings auch Nationen, die eher dazu neigen die Moral des Gegner zu brechen, als ein Missionsziel zu eroberrn.

ttg schreibt:

Zitat


Russen sind brutal. Wenn die gespielt werden, geht viel kaputt. Da gewinnt man manchmal auch ohne Taktik.


Sag ich doch :)
In 15 Minuten sind die Russen auf´n Kurfürstendamm...

7

Dienstag, 10. August 2010, 14:20

Ich finde, es ist auch eine valide Taktik, auf das brechen der Company Morale zu spekulieren, indem man versucht, gezielt die schwächsten oder isoliertesten Platoons schnell zu zerstören (oder ein Company HQ jagt).

Nicht jedes Szenario ist dafür geeignet, und man scheitert schnell, wenn man vom Start weg allzu offensichtlich das Platoon-Hunting beginnt.

Es kann auch eine interessante Variante sein, wenn man feststellt, dass ein Szenario an Contested Objectives klemmt (Jede Runde ein Mini-Platoon auf 10cm ranziehen - besonders beliebt mit Universal Carriers).
“Never trade the joy of playing for the pursuit of victory, and lead by example.”

8

Mittwoch, 11. August 2010, 21:16

2. Perseverance heißt übersetzt Ausdauer
Auch wenn Dein/e Königstiger/Panther soeben das Zeitliche gesegnet haben: es ist nicht vorbei, bevor die fette Lady singt

3. Konzentration Mass the effects of overwhelming combat power at the decisive place and time.
Dies ist ein Punkt der vielen Anfängern schwer fällt: egal ob man darauf abzielt, den Anderen von der Tischplatte zu ballern oder ob man das Spiel durch das Erobern eines objectives gewinnen will: wenn man seine Anstrengungen konzentriert, kommt mehr raus. Es ist z.B. wünschenswert, dass ein gegnerisches platoon in der Schussphase gleich unter 50% fällt, damit es die Möglichkeit hat, den Heimweg anzutreten. Wenn dies passiert, steigen auch die Überlebenschancen der eigenen Truppen nicht unerheblich. :)

Sehr lustig ist es auch, generische Panzer mit einer kombinierten Streitmacht anzugehen, Ari+Panzer+ Infanterie zum Beispiel, damit eventuelle bailed out Resultate in der Shooting Phase gleich zu eroberten Panzern in der Assault Phase werden.

4.Ökonomie
Ökonomie ist dann die andere Seite der Konzentration, wenn ich irgendwo ein objective erobern will, dann reicht es, wenn ich den Gegner woanders nur beschäftige. Wenn mein Gegner gerade mit seinen Panthern Jagd auf meine Stuarts macht, dann beschäftigen meine 235 Punkte gerade 560 von ihm.
In 15 Minuten sind die Russen auf´n Kurfürstendamm...

9

Donnerstag, 12. August 2010, 11:36

3. Konzentration Mass the effects of overwhelming combat power at the decisive place and time.
Dies ist ein Punkt der vielen Anfängern schwer fällt: egal ob man darauf abzielt, den Anderen von der Tischplatte zu ballern oder ob man das Spiel durch das Erobern eines objectives gewinnen will: wenn man seine Anstrengungen konzentriert, kommt mehr raus.


Das ist genau der Punkt, der mich an den FoW-Regeln stört: viele Szenarien belohnen eine Konzentration von Truppen (und damit ROF), die immer "sehr seltsam aussieht". Ich hatte z.B ein Fighting Withdrawal Spiel gegen DonVoss, in dem er seine komplette britische Armee zu einem Block (Base an Base) zu einem Nachtangriff aufgestellt und auf ein Objective zugerollt hat. Zwei Runden missglückte Spotting-Würfe später war das Spiel entschieden. Danke. Toller Samstagnachmittag. :rolleyes:
Daher: Konzentration ja, aber in kontrollierten Dosen.
“Never trade the joy of playing for the pursuit of victory, and lead by example.”

10

Donnerstag, 12. August 2010, 12:40

Zuwenig wert wird bei den aufgeführten Prinzipien auf die Kenntniss der gegnerischen Charaktere gelegt. Wie schon Sun Tzu sagte: ...wird der in 100 Schlachten unbesiegt bleiben, der sich und die Stärken und Schwächen seiner Gegner kennt..(oder so ähnlich ;) ).
Wir neigen immer dazu, nach einem bestimmten Schema vorzugehen. Spielerfahrung kann auch daran gemessen werden, wieviel Variationen an Spielzügen man auf eine bestimmte Konstellation hin entwickelt. Andereseits kann man durch Beobachtung seines Gegenspielers bestimmte Grundmuster erkennen, die man dann in seine eingene Strategie einbauen kann.

11

Donnerstag, 12. August 2010, 14:20

Zu Sun-Tzu wollte ich erst nach der Kampagne kommen ;)

Für Liebhaber der englischen Sprache:
Sun-Tzu

Hier noch die Ergänzung zum Zitat des Genossen:
"Wenn du dich und den Feind kennst, brauchst du den Ausgang von hundert Schlachten nicht zu fürchten. Wenn du dich selbst kennst, doch nicht den Feind, wirst du für jeden Sieg, den du erringst, eine Niederlage erleiden. Wenn du weder den Feind noch dich selbst kennst, wirst du in jeder Schlacht unterliegen."
aus WIKIQUOTE :D , wer tippt denn noch selbst? :whistling:

Aber zum Glück gibt es Würfel...
In 15 Minuten sind die Russen auf´n Kurfürstendamm...

Dieser Beitrag wurde bereits 1 mal editiert, zuletzt von »tattergreis« (12. August 2010, 15:30)


12

Donnerstag, 12. August 2010, 15:24

Na, da bin ich ja mal gespannt, wie Du nach der Kampagne zu Sun Tzu kommen wirst ;)

Mein Zitat war frei aus der Hüfte, aber ich denke die Interpretation war gar nicht so übel. Deine Übersetzung hört sich natürlich wesentlich adäquater an.

Ich bin immer gespannt, wie sich Theorie in Praxis übersetzten lässt. Vielleicht nutz mir das Studium der alten Meister ja beim nächsten Spiel gegen Dich! :P

Ähnliche Themen